Delaware River Mill Society, PO Box 298, Stockton, NJ 08559 | P: 609-397-3586 | F: 609-397-3913 | Email
 
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DRMS Progressive Dinner May 10, 2014, renew your membership, or make a donation.
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2014 Time Travel Camp registration packet
2014 Images of the Mills Prospectus coming soon! 2013 Images of the Mills Prospectus
2014 DRMS Craft Show Application
Gentle Yoga at the Mill

Welcome!

The Prallsville Mills were included on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The entire property became part of the D & R Canal State Park in 1974.

The Delaware River Mill Society
In 1969, Donald Jones bought the Prallsville Mills property for the purpose of tranferring it to the state, which happened in 1973. In 1976, when the State of New Jersey was unable to fund the restoration of its newly acquired Prallsville Mills, local citizens formed Delaware River Mill Society and obtained a long-term lease, which gives the Mill Society the responsibility to “restore, preserve, operate, maintain and interpret” the site.

The Mill has become a place of cultural and environmental events attracting widespread participation. Concerts, art exhibitions, antique shows, holiday parties, school fund-raiser auctions, meetings, as well as private parties, are a source of income for restoration and maintenance of the site.

In addition, the complex now provides offices and space for many other non-profit organizations:

Each of us has a part to play in saving a segment of our past and making it a part of our future. Click on Membership to help the Mill.

Prallsville Mills Complex

At one time the Delaware River region was dotted with mills of every size and variety. Our nation’s economic growth was strong because of the variety of industries these mills provided. It was a time when the prevalent technology meant, if you had water, you had a source of power. The very nature of this form of technology also carried its own risks; all those mills were located in flood plains. It is not surprising that few of these grand mills that helped build the economic strength of the area no longer exist.

Prallsville had continued to thrive and survive floods, fires and other natural challenges over the years because it had remained a profitable industrial site. The site’s location in relation to the changing means of transportation ensured its ability to prosper. We are fortunate to have a rare intact early industrial site, which tells the broad story of the interdependence of the development of transportation with commerce.

Today the Prallsville Mills is a resource for a wide variety of cultural, arts and community activities while also providing docent tours of the Mill Complex and the recently preserved miller’s house, the John Prall Jr. House. The Prallsville Mills site is a perfect example of how our historic sites can remain an active asset to the community today while preserving and explaining or country’s story of economic growth in relation our natural resources, transportation development and technology.

Please make a donation to the Mill Society and be a part of saving a segment of our past and making it a part of today and the future.

 

 
    
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If you appreciate the Prallsville Mills as a resource for the Delaware River region, there's an easy way for you to help maintain the historic mill complex. iGive is a free service which enables shoppers to earn money for their favorite cause whenever they make an online purchase. Just go to www.igive.com/DRMS, sign up and start shopping! Over 1100 stores participate including Staples, Petco and Amazon.
© Copyright 2003 Delaware River Mill Society
Updated by Delaware River Mill Society
Photos by Mill Members James Lucas, Scott Maddux, and Edie Sharp unless otherwise noted.
Site designed by James Lucas & Edie Sharp